End of Life Resources

Which end of life option is right for you and your loved ones? Burial Funeral, Cremation, University Donation, Live Organ Donation, or Body Donation to Science

Each day, potential donors ask us about the differences between burial, cremation, university donation, organ donation, and body donation to science.  We certainly understand the need to know the difference, as it is a very important choice to make.  Here at Science Care, we only coordinate body donation to science.  But the truth of the matter is, donating your body to science may not be the best fit for you. READ MORE

Funeral Homes

The death of the funeral: Will they be obsolete when millennials pass?

The way we approach death in our society is changing. Fewer people are opting for a traditional embalmed-body funeral, instead choosing informal and personal celebrations. More than half of all people now choose cremation over burial, up from just 28% in 2002. Part of this change is cost—with a traditional burial averaging $9,000, but there is more to it than that. People want the process to express their own values, which are more informal, less religious, and more environmentally conscious than past generations.

 

Many are now also considering donating their body to science. More than 140,000 people have pledged to donate their bodies through the world’s largest donate your body to science program, Science Care, with numbers rising every month. Part of this shift is a matter of cost, as donating your body to science is free, and many providers, such as Science Care, will return the donor’s ashes to loved ones within three to five weeks upon completion of the scientific and medical studies.

 

Donating your body to science also aligns closely with many of today’s cultural values:

  • Make the world a better place than we found it
  • Advance medical science by helping discover new treatments
  • Help those who are ill or suffering
  • Train doctors on new techniques
  • Reduce our environmental footprint
  • Provide medical research and training for current and future military service members

 

The shift in funeral practices is likely to accelerate, as Baby Boomers come to the end of their lives and Millennials reshape mainstream culture to their own circumstances and values. A recent Deloitte study, for example, shows Millennials have an average net worth of a mere $8,000 and are waiting longer to marry, have children, and buy their first homes – leaving them with limited income to plan for retirement and end-of-life. Add to that the continued decline in their attendance at religious services and a greater demand for relevance and authenticity, and it seems likely that traditional funeral may one day be a thing of the past.

 

For more information on how to pre-register to donate your body to science, go here.

Helping Those Who are Grieving

Grieving is something we never want to go through, but unfortunately, it’s a part of life. Most of us at one time or another have experienced grief, either first-hand through the loss of a loved-one or by trying to help a friend who was going through the process. In order to understand grief, it’s important to know that losing a loved one can be a life-changing event. It’s an emotional roller coaster that can take a while to get off. Some people never do.READ MORE

Coroner

What is a Coroner and What Do They Do?

People often confuse coroners with Medical Examiners. Although they are associated with the same line of work, there are key differences. A Medical Examiner is a licensed forensic pathologist (Medical Doctor) specializing in the investigation of violent, unexpected, suspicious or unattended deaths. A coroner on the other hand, is an elected or appointed public official whose primary duty is to determine and certify cause of death. READ MORE

What is a Death Certificate and why do you need one?

A death certificate is an official document issued by the government, which declares cause of death, location of death, time of death and some other personal information about the deceased.

There are several reasons why you may need to obtain a death certificate. Most often it’s to serve as proof for legal purposes. These reasons may include accessing pension benefits, claiming life insurance, settling estates, getting married (if a widow or widower needs to prove that their previous partner has passed), or arranging for a funeral. Government officials may need the death certificate to review the cause of death during investigations to determine if foul-play occurred. Public health officials use death certificates to compile data on various statistics, including leading causes of death. Public health policies depend heavily on the mortality data from death certificates because they are the only source of information about the causes of death and illnesses preceding death. READ MORE

Hope for the Holidays: 5 Tips for Turning Holiday Grief into Optimism

The holidays are supposed to be a time of joy, but not everyone embraces the season with eagerness and a happy heart. Those who suffer grief over the death of a loved one often dread the holidays, when feelings of loss can be most powerful. Fortunately, there is hope–and help–for holiday grievers. Not only can grief be managed and eased during the holidays, it’s possible to endure the season with a healthy dose of optimism.READ MORE

What is a Eulogy?

Eulogies have been around for a long time. The first known documentation of the word appears in the 15th century and came from the Medieval Latin term “eulogium”, although it’s very likely that people have been offering up different forms of eulogies long before that.READ MORE

What Does a Funeral Director Do?

The primary role of the Funeral Director is two-fold. First, to facilitate the entire funeral planning process and to make sure that everything gets completed according to the wishes of the family. And second, to serve as a counselor to families going through a particularly difficult time. READ MORE

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